I just had a quick look at the list of conflicted .NZ domains that will be released back to the available pool of domain names at 1:00pm on Thursday 30th March 2017 if they have not been registered by this date. Looks like ANZ bank completely dropped the ball registering the shorter version of some of their names:

anzairpointsvisa.nz
anzbarometer.nz
anzbizhub.nz
anzbuildersanddecorators.nz
anzcarloans.nz
anzcourtside.nz
anzcricketworld.nz
anzdirect.nz
anzdistillery.nz
anzeverydayrewards.nz
anzfuturewise.nz
anzinvestmentonline.nz
anzinvestmentsonline.nz
anzkiosk.nz
anzmail.nz
anznationalcareers.nz
anz-national.nz
anznational.nz
anznb.nz
anznetball.nz
anznfg.nz
anzni.nz
anzn.nz
anzonlineinvestments.nz
anzpir.nz
anzplatinum.nz
anzpropertyfocus.nz
anzrad.nz
anzrecharge.nz
anzsecurities.nz
anzshareandbondtrading.nz
anzsurveys.nz
anztravelcard.nz
anzvisadebit.nz
anzworld.nz
anzworldvisa.nz

Some of the .CO.NZ domains such as anzsecurities.co.nz resolve to a site that asks for login information so it should be an easy phishing target. Other banks seem to have done their homework: I couldn’t find any domains from Kiwibank, BNZ, or Westpac for example.

Last week Sunday we finally managed to walk the Paekakriki Escarpment track. It was our first longer walk as parents, and carrying a toddler along all the way in a frontpack wasn’t easy, but we did it in the end (our friends brought their 3 kids along as well). I should probably mention that we walked from Paekakariki to Pukerua Bay which looked much easier than the other way around. So unless you like a good challenge, I recommend starting in Paekakariki.

As you can see in the photos, the weather was just perfect on the day. Blue skies, not too hot, and no wind. The walking time was about 4.5 hours but we were quite slow due to the children. Speaking about bringing children, it is not recommended according to the signs which is understandable because the track is quite steep at times. But as long as you’re cautious and either carry them or hold hands, we didn’t find it much of an issue.

I’ve done a bit of walking in the Wellington region and the Paekakariki Escarpment Track is definitely one of my favourites. See for yourself:

Paekakariki Escarpment Track Sign

Kapiti Island

Kapiti Coast

View towards Pukerua Bay

Kapiti Coast

View towards Pukerua Bay

Swing bridge and train tracks

After relaunching my personal site a few weeks ago, supporting independent quality journalism was another piece in the puzzle to supporting the indie web. As I wrote on the iwantmyname blog earlier this year:

If one thing became apparent to me in 2016, it’s that we should strive for a more independent web. An independent web with individual voices outside the big social networks and less reliant on corporations making people the product by collecting data on them. Hence, we are making it our mission at iwantmyname to help you becoming an indie web user in 2017 and beyond.

There have been several events triggering my desire of helping you to achieve that:

  1. The current political climate with the rise of right-wing populists globally.
  2. How fake news on social networks like Facebook or Twitter can impact popular opinion.
  3. An increasingly more unpleasant climate in social media with people abusing each other.

I’m happy there is now a service in New Zealand that allows you to support independent journalists and smaller news outlets. Found via Richard MacManus:

Bill Bennett explains:

PressPatron is a way for readers like you to support the media you use. It is voluntary and painless. You get to set the amount you contribute. You can make a one-off payment or commit to a series of payments over time.

Most of all, PressPatron is not a pay wall. The stories on this site will stay free. You don’t have to pay a cent. The idea is that you’re supporting a website, not buying anything.

Of course similar things have been tried before, but I think what’s different this time is that more and more people see the value in good journalism.

It took me less than five minutes to start paying for recently launched Newsroom, and I hope others will follow in implementing PressPatron. Their website is already listing a small number of other publishers you can start supporting.

Yes, finally (and vice versa)!

In the aftermath of Apple’s announcements earlier today, it released an update to iTunes with a new feature described as rent once, watch anywhere. The release notes for iTunes 12.6, which is available as a free upgrade on the Mac App Store, say:

Now you can enjoy your iTunes movie rentals across your devices with iOS 10.3 or tvOS 10.2.

With this new feature, you should be able to start a movie rental on an iOS device and finish it at home on an Apple TV for example, which is a welcome change to what was an overly inflexible system.

Source: iTunes Adds Rent Once, Watch Anywhere Feature

I was finding myself in the situation of renting a movie on Apple TV and wanted to continue watching on another iOS device (mostly iPad) a few times, and even didn’t rent movies because of that restriction. Or I was browsing on iPhone what movie I could watch when at home and it would’ve been just nice if I was able to rent it straight away. Also useful to add content to a “watch later” list, e.g. for $.99 movies or documentaries that are only available at that price for a short period of time.

I used to live across the road from Garage Project in Aro Valley. If you have the chance to try one of their beers, you really should–they’re nothing short of genius:

To ensure that Dark Resonance was—as head brewer Pete Gillespie put it—”as dark as the devil himself,” the beer was assaulted with non-stop black, death, and doom metal as it fermented. For eleven straight days, a speaker inside the tank blasted the kind of playlist that would cause the Sistine Chapel’s paint job to peel, in the hopes that it would affect the beer in the most diabolical way.

Source: What Happened When a Brewery Fed Its Beer 11 Days of Heavy Metal Music

Beautiful day flying from Paraparaumu to Nelson last Friday. I flew Sounds Air before from Nelson to Wellington but never from a small regional hub like Kapiti Coast Airport. It’s great not to having to drive all the way to the city and I hope the connection is working for the airline (their Cessna 208 Caravan has 12 seats and we were seven passengers flying to Nelson and ten coming back). Looking forward to my next trip from Kapiti Coast Airport to Auckland which is with Air New Zealand to see how they compare.

Zero Accounting Search Results

This morning I came across an article on DomainNameWire where Andrew Allemann wrote about an ad from Xero he heard on a podcast:

The problem is that it literally fails the radio test. As a result, about a quarter of the commercial was spent explaining how to spell it.

“That’s Zero… X-E-R-O”.

So it’s not really that good of a domain name. If you tell someone to visit Xero.com and don’t tell them how to spell it, they’ll end up at Zero.com.

I haven’t heard the ad but it seems like Xero is mentioning their full domain name. Now the company is almost a household name in New Zealand so I’m not sure it would be much of an issue here. But I can see how it might be difficult for people hearing about them for the first time, and what Xero probably should do for “radio” ads is just use their name without the .COM part.

Even if people understand it as “zero” it should be easy enough to find them online. For example, a quick search using the keywords “zero accounting software” (see photo above) shows Xero holding the top positions for paid and organic results. As you can see, Google also autocorrects the search to “xero accounting software”.

So should Xero own Zero.com as domain name? After all, for a company their size it should be possible to acquire the domain if the current owner is willing to sell. I tend to say it’s a “maybe” due to the fact Xero is still easy to find online and their strong branding.

As I wrote recently about recently launched domain alternatives in New Zealand, end user adoption is the most important metric if we want new top-level domains to succeed. Over the last few weeks I came across many other great websites using new gTLDs–mostly on Twitter, but also in videos on Youtube, at the movies, and even when withdrawing money at a local ATM:

  • trappist.one: Scientists are using the .ONE domain to document their findings on the newly discovered solar system with Earth-like planets.
  • tim.blog: Life-hack guru Tim Ferris recently switched his personal site to the new .BLOG TLD. Such a short and memorable domain!
  • joinhouse.party: A currently popular app for group live chats cleverly markets their app on the .PARTY domain extension.
  • chime.aws: Internet giant Amazon launched a new product for online communication with their own .AWS brand top-level domain.
  • abc.xyz: Google’s parent company Alphabet makes use of the .XYZ suffix for their corporate website.
  • slack.engineering: The engineering team of communication platform Slack writes about their work on this .ENGINEERING website.
  • data.world: this “social network for data people” came to my attention after receiving $19 million in funding. A short and catchy .WORLD domain indeed.
  • opensource.guide: Brought to you by GitHub is this guide on Open Source software and how to start and contribute to projects. I couldn’t imagine a better TLD than .GUIDE for this!
  • npr.design: The National Public Radio’s design team makes good use of sharing their stories on this .DESIGN site.
  • runner3.game: Seen during a presentation of Nintendo’s new Switch console. Publishers are embracing .GAME as a new domain alternative for video games.
  • mindovermoney.kiwi: Local New Zealand bank Kiwibank started this campaign on .KIWI recently which I saw on an ATM where I live (see photo above). I also heard about it on the radio.
  • powerrangers.movie: A trailer for the upcoming Power Rangers movie ended with advertising its .MOVIE-based marketing site. Not that I am particularly interested in this one, but it was shown before Logan which can be found on — you guessed it — Logan.MOVIE!
  • terminal.training: “A video training course to cure you of any fear of the terminal. For designers, new developers, UX, UI, product owners, and anyone who’s been asked to “just open the terminal”.” — just perfect on a .TRAINING domain.

Source: New Generic Top-Level Domains: Three Years Later